This site will provide visitors with an experience I like to describe as ‘diving under the volcano’. It is at this point that the major lava flow that descended when Gunung Agung erupted 1963 entered the sea. Thu gush in Agung’s crater rim is still visible today. The ridge that was formed along the side of this flow actually continues underwater. batu-nitiThe site is a very steep drop of coral encrusted black lava rock adjacent to a black sand slope to the west that forms the end of Muntig bay. An enormous Black coral bush at the edge between 16m and 22m marks your waypoint as you descend; until 2006 it was completely inhabited by Coral shrimp fish (a.k.a Razor fish as they vertically, face down in the bushes branches like metallic decorations), but they vanished after a particularly rough monsoonal storm. Two dinner plate sized Frog fish live here now. Another particularity of this  site is the huge number of barrel sponges of all sizes and shapes, some of them barely able to hold on to the steep drop. Besides the general reef fish varieties, macro enthusiasts find more of the critters and Nudi branch the area is known for and therefore often forget to look up and miss what else may cruise by: Schooling Barracuda are regulars, and at this is a point jutting away from the main shore line, occasionally, large pelagics cruise by. A German family I had dropped here some time ago swam into a fully grown Whale shark within minutes after submerging.

Diveable: Year round
Maximum Depth: 40m
Current: Mild, picking up at outer extremity
Level of experience: All