Diveable: Year round
Visibility: 10-30m Maximum
Depth: 35m (the reef extends to well below 50)
Current: Low
Level of Experience: All

This is the last site on the rocky shore lines that overlook the ‘Drop Off’, Alam Anda and Batu Kelebit between Tulamben Bay to the west and the next bay to the east, Muntig Bay. It is also known as the ‘Car-wreck’ site as someone had the brilliant idea to sink Toyota mini van here that was no longer in use to form an ‘artificial reef’. It is an eye sore rather, and not worth the bother. The reef flat to the east of it, however, is very rich, and macro photographers like this site’s sandy slope for the – albeit seasonal – abundance of Nudibranchs. While investigating this area in 1998 with my Japanese dive master Yumiko (a not just highly competent and passionate diver, but equally gutsy girl), we followed down the sandy slope, with nothing particular in sight. At around 48m, Yumiko busied herself with her new digital camera and a crab. Not much of an eye for ‘small stuff’, I looked beyond and noticed a rock that struck me as odd. It jutted out of the sand at 55m for about 2m by 3m wide. This side of Bali is all volcanic, and the few granite rocks that are found in the area were all broken into smaller, cubical pieces by the eruption, or round boulders that were washed down the mountain while rivers were still flowing before the eruption. But this one had a perfectly flat, smooth surface. When I touched it, I was dumbfounded; it was a thick slab of steel. And up to this day I am sure it was not nitrogen-induced imagination. But I haven’t got a clue how it possibly got there, more than 150m offshore, as there are no other known wrecks in the area.